William Castle

William Castle

William Castle (April 24, 1914 – May 31, 1977) was an American film director, producer, screenwriter, and actor. He learned the trade of filmmaking and became a director, acquiring a reputation for the ability to churn out competent B-movies quickly and on budget. He eventually struck out on his own, producing and directing thrillers which, despite their low budgets, were effectively promoted with gimmicks, a trademark for which he is best known. He was also the producer for Rosemary's Baby.

www.williamcastle.com
In: Masters, Movies, Uncategorized

Icons of Fright

Icons of Fright

Dissecting the horror genre with clinical precision since 2004! Extensive informative interviews, reviews, retrospectives and more. Icons of Fright brings you the best in-depth career spanning interviews with actors, writers, and directors working in the horror genre and beyond!

Artwork by Frank Powers. www.iconsoffright.com

In: Movies, Reviews

Icons of Fright

Icons of Fright

Dissecting the horror genre with clinical precision since 2004! Extensive informative interviews, reviews, retrospectives and more. Icons of Fright brings you the best in-depth career spanning interviews with actors, writers, and directors working in the horror genre and beyond!

Artwork by Frank Powers. www.iconsoffright.com

In: Movies, Reviews

The Harryhausen Chronicles

This engaging 1997 documentary stands alone as the definitive tribute to stop-motion animator and special effects legend Ray Harryhausen. The film is blessed with the participation of Harryhausen himself, comfortable in his role as FX guru and living legend, humorously reflecting on his momentous career while offering a wondrous inspection of the stop-motion models that made him famous. From before his apprenticeship on 1949's Mighty Joe Young to his final masterwork in Clash of the Titans, Harryhausen is honored as an old-school artisan, toiling in solitude to create some of the cinema's most indelible fantasies, one meticulous frame at a time. A compilation of rare film tests and previously unseen footage among the DVD bonus features makes this must-see viewing for Harryhausen devotees of any age.

www.imdb.com/title/tt0325525/
In: Masters, Movies, Special FX

The Lost Highway

The Lost Highway

Lost Highway is your satirical detour down the twisted back roads of b-movies and cult films reviews. At Lost Highway our roadside stops include horror, sci-fi, grindhouse and cult films from the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s as well as new films we deem worthy of the b-movie title.

www.the-losthighway.com
In: Movies, Reviews

Halloween Movies

Halloween Movies

The official website for Michael Myers and the Halloween Films.

Halloween is a 1978 American independent slasher horror film directed and scored by John Carpenter, co-written with producer Debra Hill, and starring Donald Pleasence and Jamie Lee Curtis in her film debut. The film was the first installment in what became the Halloween franchise. The plot is set in the fictional Midwestern town of Haddonfield, Illinois. On Halloween night in 1963, a six-year-old Michael Myers murders his older sister by stabbing her with a kitchen knife. Fifteen years later, he escapes from a psychiatric hospital, returns home, and stalks teenager Laurie Strode and her friends. Michael's psychiatrist Dr. Sam Loomis suspects Michael's intentions, and follows him to Haddonfield to try to prevent him from killing.

Halloween was produced on a budget of $325,000 and grossed $47 million at the box office in the United States, and $70 million worldwide, equivalent to nearly $240 million as of 2012, becoming one of the most profitable independent films. Many critics credit the film as the first in a long line of slasher films inspired by Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960). Halloween had many imitators and originated several clichés found in low-budget horror films of the 1980s and 1990s. Unlike many of its imitators, Halloween contains little graphic violence and gore. In 2006, it was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

Some critics have suggested that Halloween may encourage sadism and misogyny by identifying audiences with its villain. Other critics have suggested the film is a social critique of the immorality of youth and teenagers in 1970s America, with many of Myers's victims being sexually promiscuous substance abusers, while the lone heroine is depicted as innocent and pure, hence her survival (she is seen smoking cannabis in one scene however). Nevertheless, Carpenter dismisses such analyses. Several of Halloween's techniques and plot elements, although not founded in this film, have nonetheless become standard slasher movie tropes.

www.halloweenmovies.com
In: Movies
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